Projects



  • Cross platform Tensorflow deployment with Python

    Python code to run inference with Tensorflow Lite that works on Android, iOS, Windows, MacOS and Linux.



  • Deej-A.I.

    There are a number of automatic DJ tools around, which cleverly match the tempo of one song with another and mix the beats. Deej-A.I. is more of a radio DJ than a club DJ and pays more attention to what to play next than to how to play it by matching similar sounding music and not just beats.



  • Aventuras con textos / Adventures with text

    This is a set of Jupyter notebooks I have created (in both Spanish and English) to accompany classes I give in Masters in Artificial Intelligence on the latest developments in end-to-end NLP (Natural Language Processing) with neural networks.



  • Trumpy

    Trumpy is a bot that tweets in the style of Donald J. Trump using a fine-tuned GPT-2 model.



  • Goto Error

    When programming in Python, it can be quite overwhelming when you hit an error deep down in a stack of nested function calls. Inspired by Google Colab, I wrote a Jupyter notebook extension that takes you to the relevant line of source code by clicking on the item in the stack trace.



  • Chat

    I put this together for two reasons. For some time now, I have been looking for a way to communicate with my teenage sons while they are in the midst of some online gaming experience (which seems to be most of the time these days). It had got to the point that they wouldn´t answer their phones or check their WhatsApp messages, and I would have to resort to speaking to them via Discord. Or, in the case of the younger one who is at least still in the same house, I would have to go upstairs and switch the light on and off a few times so that he would take his headphones off. This little web application allows me to send text and audio messages, so I can effectively broadcast when it is “Time for dinner!”.



  • Leaderboard

    We ran a Data Science Hackathon as a Kaggle competition and I thought it would be fun to produce a “bar chart race” to track the leaderboard struggles in real time, as opposed to just seeing who had won at the end.



  • Me la Sudoku

    I discovered Sudoku on holiday in Lanzarote in 2005 and became so obsessed with it that I spent my first couple of days back at work writing a program to solve and generate new Sudokus. I was fascinated by the fact that it was impossible to tell the difference between a trivial and a fiendishly difficult Sudoku just by looking at it. The name “Me la Sudoku” is a play on the Spanish phrase “me la sudo” which is better left to your imagination.



  • WordPro

    A Professional Word Processor ;-)


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